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WP1/BS2

Antique George II English Silver Small Waiter

$2,850.00
  • London, 1728 by Charles Martin
  • Dimensions: 6 1/8 inches in diameter

We are often asked what is the difference between a salver and a waiter. The difference is size – we refer to waiters as anything smaller than 9 inches and salvers being larger than 9 inches. All waiters have borders and their designs have evolved over the years. Early 18th century waiters had a moulded border such as the Chippendale pie crust design. Scrolls and curves, which make up this design, have always been popular. Another design, beaded borders, became quite prevalent from 1735-1770. This design is an elegant look. The Rococo border came about in the mid 18th century and was a more elaborate design. This was a forerunner of the Art Nouveau style.

A rare early Antique George II English Silver Waiter with a “bath” border and a circular form. A “bath” border depicts a pattern of bracket or bow shaped sections interspersed by short straight edges. Also, the waiter is set on three hoof feet. A wonderful original crest is in the center of this piece. The hallmarks, stamped to the underside of this George II Silver Waiter, are quite clear and the piece is in pristine condition. The purpose of waiters in the 18th and 19th centuries, was to present the visitors’ calling card to the owners of a residence. Today, they are quite popular with a decanter residing on it. Also, a waiter is a nice place for your keys. This Antique George II Silver Small Waiter is quite elegant in design and would look exquisite in any setting.

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